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Vypr
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The Corruption of the Republican Party
Jan 11th, 2019 at 7:03am
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The Corruption of the Republican Party

Why has the Republican Party become so thoroughly corrupt? The reason is historical—it goes back many decades—and, in a way, philosophical. The party is best understood as an insurgency that carried the seeds of its own corruption from the start.

I don’t mean the kind of corruption that regularly sends lowlifes like Rod Blagojevich, the Democratic former governor of Illinois, to prison. Those abuses are nonpartisan and always with us. So is vote theft of the kind we’ve just seen in North Carolina—after all, the alleged fraudster employed by the Republican candidate for Congress hired himself out to Democrats in 2010.

And I don’t just mean that the Republican Party is led by the boss of a kleptocratic family business who presides over a scandal-ridden administration, that many of his closest advisers are facing prison time, that Donald Trump himself might have to stay in office just to avoid prosecution, that he could be exposed by the special counsel and the incoming House majority as the most corrupt president in American history. Richard Nixon’s administration was also riddled with criminality—but in 1973, the Republican Party of Hugh Scott, the Senate minority leader, and John Rhodes, the House minority leader, was still a normal organization. It played by the rules.

The corruption I mean has less to do with individual perfidy than institutional depravity. It isn’t an occasional failure to uphold norms, but a consistent repudiation of them. It isn’t about dirty money so much as the pursuit and abuse of power—power as an end in itself, justifying almost any means. Political corruption usually trails financial scandals in its wake—the foam is scummy with self-dealing—but it’s far more dangerous than graft. There are legal remedies for Duncan Hunter, a representative from California, who will stand trial next year for using campaign funds to pay for family luxuries.* But there’s no obvious remedy for what the state legislatures of Wisconsin and Michigan, following the example of North Carolina in 2016, are now doing.

Republican majorities are rushing to pass laws that strip away the legitimate powers of newly elected Democratic governors while defeated or outgoing Republican incumbents are still around to sign the bills. Even if the courts overturn some of these power grabs, as they have in North Carolina, Republicans will remain securely entrenched in the legislative majority through their own hyper-gerrymandering—in Wisconsin last month, 54 percent of the total votes cast for major-party candidates gave Democrats just 36 of 99 assembly seats—so they will go on passing laws to thwart election results. Nothing can stop these abuses short of an electoral landslide. In Wisconsin, a purple state, that means close to 60 percent of the total vote.

The fact that no plausible election outcome can check the abuse of power is what makes political corruption so dangerous. It strikes at the heart of democracy. It destroys the compact between the people and the government. In rendering voters voiceless, it pushes everyone closer to the use of undemocratic means.

Today’s Republican Party has cornered itself with a base of ever older, whiter, more male, more rural, more conservative voters. Demography can take a long time to change—longer than in progressives’ dreams—but it isn’t on the Republicans’ side. They could have tried to expand; instead, they’ve hardened and walled themselves off.


FULL:
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/12/how-did-republican-party-get-s...
  

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Re: The Corruption of the Republican Party
Reply #1 - Jan 11th, 2019 at 8:25am
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Because we all know that Democrats never do such things, right? Roll Eyes Perfect example, the shutdown. They are so concerned about the worker's having their checks delayed yet they can't give Trump his measly 5.7 billion simply because he is Trump.

  

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Re: The Corruption of the Republican Party
Reply #2 - Jan 11th, 2019 at 8:31am
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This thread is HILARIOUS!!!!  As if the Dems are saints and are free of corruption.  This is an EXCELLENT example of the bias that exist on this forum.  And some are totally blind to their bias.  There are no other jobs on earth more corrupt then a politician.
  


"Without morals a republic cannot subsist any length of time; they therefore who are decrying the Christian religion, whose morality is so sublime and pure (and) which insures to the good eternal happiness, are undermining the solid foundation of morals, the best security for the duration of free governments."

Charles Carroll, signer of the DOI
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Re: The Corruption of the Republican Party
Reply #3 - Jan 11th, 2019 at 8:58am
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Seawolf wrote on Jan 11th, 2019 at 8:31am:
There are no other jobs on earth more corrupt then a politician.


Except for TV Preacher ..
  

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Re: The Corruption of the Republican Party
Reply #4 - Jan 11th, 2019 at 9:49am
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Seawolf wrote on Jan 11th, 2019 at 8:31am:
There are no other jobs on earth more corrupt then a politician.


You are basically correct.  Which means we need to make transparency in government, up and down the chain, a top priority and ongoing concern.

- auditing of all election results
- permanent storage of all documents and communications
- high penalties for conducting govt affairs offline
- full transparency of all political funding
- effective limits on campaign donations
- end of gerrymandering
- strong penalties for waste/fraud/abuse
- etc

You with me?
  

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Re: The Corruption of the Republican Party
Reply #5 - Jan 11th, 2019 at 10:50am
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Vypr wrote on Jan 11th, 2019 at 7:03am:
The Corruption of the Republican Party

Why has the Republican Party become so thoroughly corrupt? The reason is historical—it goes back many decades—and, in a way, philosophical. The party is best understood as an insurgency that carried the seeds of its own corruption from the start.

I don’t mean the kind of corruption that regularly sends lowlifes like Rod Blagojevich, the Democratic former governor of Illinois, to prison. Those abuses are nonpartisan and always with us. So is vote theft of the kind we’ve just seen in North Carolina—after all, the alleged fraudster employed by the Republican candidate for Congress hired himself out to Democrats in 2010.

And I don’t just mean that the Republican Party is led by the boss of a kleptocratic family business who presides over a scandal-ridden administration, that many of his closest advisers are facing prison time, that Donald Trump himself might have to stay in office just to avoid prosecution, that he could be exposed by the special counsel and the incoming House majority as the most corrupt president in American history. Richard Nixon’s administration was also riddled with criminality—but in 1973, the Republican Party of Hugh Scott, the Senate minority leader, and John Rhodes, the House minority leader, was still a normal organization. It played by the rules.

The corruption I mean has less to do with individual perfidy than institutional depravity. It isn’t an occasional failure to uphold norms, but a consistent repudiation of them. It isn’t about dirty money so much as the pursuit and abuse of power—power as an end in itself, justifying almost any means. Political corruption usually trails financial scandals in its wake—the foam is scummy with self-dealing—but it’s far more dangerous than graft. There are legal remedies for Duncan Hunter, a representative from California, who will stand trial next year for using campaign funds to pay for family luxuries.* But there’s no obvious remedy for what the state legislatures of Wisconsin and Michigan, following the example of North Carolina in 2016, are now doing.

Republican majorities are rushing to pass laws that strip away the legitimate powers of newly elected Democratic governors while defeated or outgoing Republican incumbents are still around to sign the bills. Even if the courts overturn some of these power grabs, as they have in North Carolina, Republicans will remain securely entrenched in the legislative majority through their own hyper-gerrymandering—in Wisconsin last month, 54 percent of the total votes cast for major-party candidates gave Democrats just 36 of 99 assembly seats—so they will go on passing laws to thwart election results. Nothing can stop these abuses short of an electoral landslide. In Wisconsin, a purple state, that means close to 60 percent of the total vote.

The fact that no plausible election outcome can check the abuse of power is what makes political corruption so dangerous. It strikes at the heart of democracy. It destroys the compact between the people and the government. In rendering voters voiceless, it pushes everyone closer to the use of undemocratic means.

Today’s Republican Party has cornered itself with a base of ever older, whiter, more male, more rural, more conservative voters. Demography can take a long time to change—longer than in progressives’ dreams—but it isn’t on the Republicans’ side. They could have tried to expand; instead, they’ve hardened and walled themselves off.


FULL:
https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/12/how-did-republican-party-get-s...

You misspelled Democrat
  

I'M HERE TO KICK ASS AND DRINK WHISKEY AND LIBERALS I'M ALL OUT OF WHISKEY
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Vypr
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Re: The Corruption of the Republican Party
Reply #6 - Jan 11th, 2019 at 5:28pm
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Fiddler wrote on Jan 11th, 2019 at 8:58am:
Except for TV Preacher ..

Or NY real estate developer.
  

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